Done organic chemistry forever!


I used to love organic chemistry. Especially synthesis problems, which I felt gave me a chance to exercise my creativity and problem-solving skills. When I was competing for a spot on the Canadian IChO team, organic chemistry was probably my strong suit (although it’s also Richard’s strong suit, and in fact he apparently beat me on every section). When I decided to study chemistry at U. of T., I decided to take mostly physical and organic chemistry courses. I avoided biochemistry, because there’s too much memorization, and analytical chemistry, because I thought it would be boring. And I couldn’t fit inorganic into my schedule initially, and I ended up just not taking any inorganic courses at all.

I’m sorry to say that I don’t love organic chemistry anymore. In fact, I’m sick of it. I’ve taken CHM249 (organic chemistry II), CHM342 (organic synthesis), and CHM440 (more organic synthesis, with a focus on pharmaceutical agents). Every time I took another organic chemistry course, there were more and more reactions to memorize. The memorization was not too bad in CHM249, but there also weren’t any challenging problems of the sort I used to love solving in high school. In CHM342 the amount of memorization increased significantly, and I had an especially hard time with drawing three-dimensional transition states and predicting stereochemistry. In CHM440 there were a total of 90 named reactions. I was actually scared of synthesis problems, because, with that many reactions, there is simply no way I would be able to see the right disconnections. Luckily, there weren’t any. Suffice it to say that this course confirmed my suspicion that it was the right choice not to go to grad school to study organic synthesis…

Anyway, I had my CHM440 final exam last week, and my CHM347 exam today (biochemistry; I didn’t want to take it but if I took only courses I liked then I wouldn’t be able to graduate). Next term I’m only taking statistical mechanics. This means I’ll never have to look at another curved arrow for the rest of my life. Yippee!

In retrospect, I greatly underestimated the difficulty of fourth year—or perhaps I just bit off more than I could chew. Three of the five courses I took (CHM440, high-energy physics, general relativity I) were cross-listed as grad courses, so I guess it was foolish of me to expect them not to be so hard. There was also a grad student in my (time-dependent) quantum chem course, and at any rate it was very grad-style, with a take-home final (which was way too hard) and a term paper. I was incredibly busy toward the end of the term, trying to keep up my GPA (not that it actually matters, but I guess it’s just an irrational drive of mine).

I’ve noticed something about myself: when I’m busy doing stuff I don’t want to do, I think of all the productive things I could be doing if I had free time, such as developing the PEG Judge, studying quantum field theory, learning Haskell, or maybe learning a new (human) language. Alas, once free time arrives, I basically waste time browsing Reddit and playing games. Anyone else do this?

Now for some more awesome news. We made ACM World Finals! I’ll be representing the University of Toronto in Russia in June, together with my teammates Hao Wei and Saman Samikermani. We weren’t sure whether we were going to make it, since CMU and UMich creamed us at the regionals, and solved more problems than we did. But I guess ACM just stuck to the recent trend of inviting the top three teams from our region. We’ve got a long road ahead of us; other teams are good—really, really good—and we’re all a bit out of practice. I just hope we don’t do too badly!

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About Brian

Hi! I'm Brian Bi. As of November 2014 I live in Sunnyvale, California, USA and I'm a software engineer at Google. Besides code, I also like math, physics, chemistry, and some other miscellaneous things.
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One Response to Done organic chemistry forever!

  1. averin says:

    boooooooo chemistry

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